PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS

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WILDFIRE SEASON TIPS

As Wildfire Season approaches, here are some great tips to help reduce the risk around your home.

Also a link to the FireSmartBC website containing even more information.

https://firesmartbc.ca/

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BURN AWARENESS WEEK RUNS FROM FEB 6 – 12

To promote Burn Awareness Week, the BC Professional Fire Fighters’ Burn Fund in collaboration with BC Children’s Hospital hosts an info booth with tips and resources for families. Focusing on toddlers, who account for 74 per cent of burn injuries in British Columbia, the Burn Fund highlights survivor stories and promotes the Too Hot for Tots! program to help keep children safe.

  • Keep an eye on what you fry. Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking as many fires start  when someone is frying food

  • Watch what you are cooking. Fires start when the heat is too high. If you see any smoke or the grease starts to boil, turn the burner off

  • Make sure you are awake and alert while cooking. Alcohol and some drugs can make you sleepy

  • Wear short sleeves or roll them up so they don’t catch on fire

  • Make sure children and pets stay at least 1 metre away from a hot stove

  • Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove so no one can bump them or pull them over

  • Keep things that can catch fire, like oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels, away from the stove

  • Never pour water on a cooking pan grease fire! Smother the flames by sliding a lid or a cookie sheet over the pan and turn off the stove

  • If there is a fire in the oven, turn off the heat and keep the door closed

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ESCAPE PLANNING

Plan Ahead! If a fire breaks out in your
home, you may have only a few minutes
to get out safely once the smoke alarm
sounds. Everyone needs to know what to
do and where to go if there is a fire.

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FIRE PREVENTION WEEK

As Fire Prevention Week™ approaches, Grand Forks Fire/rescue reminds residents to
“Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety™”

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A HOME FIRE EXTINGUISHER CAN BE A LIFESAVER

A home fire extinguisher can be a lifesaver. Placed near an exit, in an easy-to-grab spot, it can put out a small fire before the firefighters arrive, or at least suppress the flames while you escape.

All household extinguishers are classified A, B, or C (or a combination of these) on the label to indicate which types of fires—ordinary combustibles, flammable liquids, or electrical—you can use them on. Many of the ones sold at home stores are classified A:B:C and fight all three types of fires.

Here’s a critical guide to knowing the different types and sizes of fire extinguishers as well as how to use them.

Size of Extinguisher Matters

The main distinction among home extinguishers is size. In most cases bigger is better, but sometimes the biggest extinguishers are too heavy to maneuver. (The weight on an extinguisher refers to the amount of chemical inside; the canister adds several more pounds.)

The National Fire Protection Association (www.nfpa.org) recommends an extinguisher for each floor. But no matter how many you have, nothing can substitute for the most important safety tool: a fire plan. Make sure everyone in the family knows how to get out in a hurry, where to meet outside, and how to call 911. Even if you think you've put out the fire on your own, don't cancel that emergency call. Leave it to the pros to decide if it's really out.

Classes of Fires and Ratings

Every household extinguisher is labeled A, B, or C, which tells you the types of fires the extinguisher is effective against. A is ordinary combustibles like wood, paper, and cloth; B is flammable liquids, such as gasoline or cooking oil; and C is live electricity.

How to Use a Fire Extinguisher:

Keep extinguishers where you can see and reach them easily, near the room's exit. That way you can fight the fire with your back to the door and make a quick escape if flames get out of control.

To help you remember how to use an extinguisher, use the acronym PASS:

-Pull the extinguisher's safety pin.

-Aim the chemical at the source of the flames rather than at the flames themselves, standing at least 6 feet from the fire (or as directed on the extinguisher's label).

-Squeeze the trigger and hold it, keeping the extinguisher upright.

-Sweep the source of the flames until the extinguisher runs dry.

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FIRESMART

The homes that are prepared are the homes left standing.
In recent years, the world has seen some of the most devastating wildfires in history. But those who fought those fires also saw a silver lining: the homes that survived did something different, but simple.

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MONTHLY SAFETY MESSAGE

DOING LAUNDRY IS MOST LIKELY PART OF YOUR EVERY DAY ROUTINE. BUT DID YOU KNOW HOW IMPORTANT TAKING CARE OF YOUR CLOTHES DRYER IS TO THE SAFETY OF YOUR HOME? WITH A FEW SIMPLE SAFETY TIPS YOU CAN HELP PREVENT A CLOTHES DRYER FIRE.

• Have your dryer installed and serviced by a professional. • Do not use the dryer without a lint filter. • Make sure you clean the lint filter before or after each load of laundry. Remove lint that has collected around the drum. • Rigid or flexible metal venting material should be used to sustain proper air flow and drying time. • Make sure the air exhaust vent pipe is not restricted and the outdoor vent flap will open when the dryer is operating. Once a year, or more often if you notice that it is taking longer than normal for your clothes to dry, clean lint out of the vent pipe or have a dryer lint removal service do it for you. • Keep dryers in good working order. Gas dryers should be inspected by a qualified professional to make sure that the gas line and connection are intact and free of leaks. • Make sure the right plug and outlet are used and that the machine is connected properly. • Follow the manufacturer’s operating instructions and don’t overload your dryer. • Turn the dryer off if you leave home or when you go to bed.

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SMOKE ALARMS

Grand Forks Fire/Rescue offers the following tips for making sure the smoke alarms in your home are maintained and working properly:

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home.

  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month using the test button, and make sure everyone in your home knows their sound.

  • Change the batteries once a year or If an alarm “chirps,” warning the battery is low, replace the battery right away.

  • Replace all smoke alarms, including alarms that use 10-year batteries and hard-wired alarms, when they are ten years old or sooner if they do not respond properly when tested.


 Grand Forks residents with questions and/or concerns about the updated smoke alarm requirements may Grand Forks Fire/Rescue