LATEST NEWS

News, Updates and Safety Messages

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GEAR UP AND FEEL THE HEAT.

April 27th 2022

Are you looking to serve your community, be part of a great team and learn new skills? Then we have the event for you.

Grand Forks Fire/Rescue is hosting our 3rd Annual Firefighter For The Night. This exciting event gives you the chance to meet our members, ask questions and best of all have a little fun along the way putting the wet stuff on the red stuff. 

For more information about this event or to sign up. 


Contact us by phone at 250-442-3612 or by email firehall@grandforks.ca 

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FLOOD PREPARATION

March 01-22

Flood Preparation-Get ready!


Freshet is just around the corner and it is time to remind everyone to be prepared for potential flooding.

As we know floods develop quickly so it is important that we are ready well in advance.

Some of the key things to get ready in advance are: Construct barriers to stop floodwater from entering the building, have working pumps on hand, unplug electrical appliances, keep and emergency supply kit, including water, stored in an easily accessible, waterproof place. Be prepared to evacuate, including fill your cars gas tank and most importantly evacuate if you are so advised.

During a flood: Let someone know where you are going, help your neighbor, stay out of flood waters if possible, avoid the river’s edge and moving water, do not drive into flooded areas, stay away from downed power lines.

After the flood: Do not return home until local authorities say it is safe to do so, do not drink or cook with the tap water until authorities say it is safe, avoid floodwaters, which could be contaminated or electrically charged, watch for weakened roadways, clean and disinfect everything that got wet and service any damaged septic systems, pits and leaching systems as soon as possible.

Follow the RDKB (emergency.rdkb.com) and City of Grand Forks (grandforks.ca) website for updates on weather reports and flooding information.


In Safety


Deputy Chief Piché

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SUNSHINE VALLEY COMMUNITY SERVICES VISIT THE FIRE HALL

FEBRUARY 18TH -2022

SUNSHINE VALLEY COMMUNITY SERVICES LEARNED HOW TO SAFELY USE A FIRE EXTINGUISHER AND KITCHEN SAFETY

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GRAND FORKS HIGH SCHOOL CLASS LEARNS ABOUT CAREER IN THE FIRE SERVICE

February 25th-22

DC Piché talks about Career on the Fire Service and Grand Forks Fire Rescue

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ELECTRIC PORTABLE HEATER SAFETY

November 3rd, 2021

Heating

Heating is the second leading cause of home fires, deaths and injuries. December, January and February are the peak months for heating fires. Space heaters are the type of equipment most often involved in home heating equipment fires, figuring in two of every five fires (40%).  

Carbon Monoxide

Often called the invisible killer, carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas created when fuels such as gasoline, wood, coal, propane, etc. do not burn completely. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel are potential sources of CO. Carbon monoxide incidents are more common during the winter months, and in residential properties.  

Winter storms

Most of the Canada is at risk for winter storms, which can cause dangerous and sometimes life-threatening conditions. Blinding wind-driven snow, extreme cold, icy road conditions, downed trees and power lines can all wreak havoc on our daily schedules. Home fires occur more in the winter than in any other season, and heating equipment is involved in one of every six reported home fires, and one in every five home fire deaths.

Generators

Portable generators are useful during power outages, however, many homeowners are unaware that the improper use of portable generators can be risky. The most common dangers associated with portable generators are carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, electrical shock or electrocution, and fire hazards. According to a 2013 Consumer Product Safety Commission report, half of the generator-related deaths happened in the four coldest months of the year, November through February, and portable generators were involved in the majority of carbon monoxide deaths involving engine-driven tools. 

Candles

December is the peak time of year for home candle fires; the top two days for home candle fires are Christmas and Christmas Eve. Each year between 2013-2017, an average of 7,900 home candle fires were reported each year.

Electrical

Electrical home fires are one of the leading causes of home fires. Roughly half of all home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment, while nearly another half involved other known types of equipment like washer or dryer fans, and portable or stationary space heaters.  

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LEADING RISKS DURING THE WINTER

November 3rd, 2021

Heating

Heating is the second leading cause of home fires, deaths and injuries. December, January and February are the peak months for heating fires. Space heaters are the type of equipment most often involved in home heating equipment fires, figuring in two of every five fires (40%).  

Carbon Monoxide

Often called the invisible killer, carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas created when fuels such as gasoline, wood, coal, propane, etc. do not burn completely. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel are potential sources of CO. Carbon monoxide incidents are more common during the winter months, and in residential properties.  

Winter storms

Most of the Canada is at risk for winter storms, which can cause dangerous and sometimes life-threatening conditions. Blinding wind-driven snow, extreme cold, icy road conditions, downed trees and power lines can all wreak havoc on our daily schedules. Home fires occur more in the winter than in any other season, and heating equipment is involved in one of every six reported home fires, and one in every five home fire deaths.

Generators

Portable generators are useful during power outages, however, many homeowners are unaware that the improper use of portable generators can be risky. The most common dangers associated with portable generators are carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, electrical shock or electrocution, and fire hazards. According to a 2013 Consumer Product Safety Commission report, half of the generator-related deaths happened in the four coldest months of the year, November through February, and portable generators were involved in the majority of carbon monoxide deaths involving engine-driven tools. 

Candles

December is the peak time of year for home candle fires; the top two days for home candle fires are Christmas and Christmas Eve. Each year between 2013-2017, an average of 7,900 home candle fires were reported each year.

Electrical

Electrical home fires are one of the leading causes of home fires. Roughly half of all home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment, while nearly another half involved other known types of equipment like washer or dryer fans, and portable or stationary space heaters.  

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CARBON MONOXIDE AWARENESS WEEK

November 3rd, 2021

November 1 to 7 is Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week in B.C. During this week, fire departments, educators, government and industry work together to teach people about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning, the symptoms and sources, and how to avoid becoming ill.

NEWS RELEASE

Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week: Prevent CO in Your Home

Grand Forks Fire/Rescue – British Columbia’s annual Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week runs from November 1 to 7, and Grand Forks Fire/Rescue is reminding you to prevent carbon monoxide (CO) build up in your home by properly maintaining all fuel burning appliances and installing CO alarms.


“We saw several tragedies earlier this year due to carbon monoxide poisoning,” said Deputy Fire Chief Piché.

“These deaths are entirely preventable, and we want to make sure everyone stays safe and healthy.” 


The Grand Forks Fire/Rescue also reminds you to install CO alarms in your home if you have a wood or gas-fired fireplace, an attached garage or any other fuel-burning appliance, such as furnaces, hot water heaters or dryers.

It’s important to never use barbeques or portable fuel-burning heaters inside the home or garage, even if the garage doors are open. Only use them outside, away from all doors, windows, vents, and other building openings.

“You should install a working CO alarm on every storey of your home and next to each sleeping area,” said Deputy Chief Piché. “Make sure to test and clean your carbon monoxide alarms regularly and replace them according to manufacturer’s instructions.”


What is CO?

  • CO is known as the “silent killer” because it is an invisible, tasteless and odourless gas that can be deadly. CO is NOT natural gas – natural gas has a harmless chemical called mercaptan added to it to make it smell like rotten eggs.

  •  CO is produced when fuels such as propane, gasoline, natural gas, heating oil or wood do not

burn completely in fuel-burning appliances and devices.

  • CO inhibits the blood's capacity to carry oxygen and can cause health problems before you even notice that it's present. 

At low levels, effects include flu-like symptoms, such as tiredness, headaches, shortness of breath and impaired motor functions.

  • At high levels, or if you are exposed to low levels for long periods of time, you can experience dizziness, chest pain, poor vision and difficulty thinking.

  • At very high levels, it can cause convulsions, coma and death.


Prevent CO in your home

  • Ensure fuel-burning appliances, chimneys and vents are properly maintained, as well as cleaned and inspected annually. Visit www.technicalsafetybc.ca to find a licensed contractor near you.

  • Check that all outside appliance vents are not blocked.

  • Ensure all portable fuel-burning heaters are vented properly, according to manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Never use the stove or oven to heat your home.

  • Open a chimney flue before using a fireplace for adequate ventilation.

  • Never run a vehicle or other fueled engine or motor inside a garage, even if the garage doors are open. Always remove a vehicle from the garage immediately after starting it.


Know the symptoms of CO

  • Exposure to CO can cause flu-like symptoms such as headaches, nausea, dizziness, as well as confusion, drowsiness,

loss of consciousness and death.

  • If your CO alarm sounds, and you or other occupants are suffering from symptoms of CO poisoning, get everyone

out of the home immediately. Then call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number from outside.

  • If your CO alarm sounds, and no one is suffering from symptoms of CO poisoning, check to see if the battery needs replacing, or the alarm has reached its "end-of-life" before calling 9-1-1.


Know the sound of your CO alarm

  • Your CO alarm sounds different than your smoke alarm. Test BOTH alarms monthly and make sure everyone in your

home knows the difference between the two alarm sounds.

  • Don’t be confused by the sound of your CO alarm’s low-battery warning. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions so you know the difference between the low-battery warning, the “end-of-life” warning, and the alarm alerting you to the presence of CO in your home.


Additional Resources:

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For more information, contact:

Deputy Chief Piché @ 250-442-3612, firehall@grandforks.ca

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LEARN THE SOUNDS OF SAFETY

Sept-16-21

As Fire Prevention Week™ approaches, Grand Forks Fire/Rescue reminds residents to
“Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety™”

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FIRE CENTRE UPDATE

Sept 10-21

Effective at noon PST on Friday, Sept. 10, 2021, campfires will again be allowed in the Boundary Zone of the Southeast Fire Centre. The combination of a return to more seasonal weather conditions, with shorter days and cooler temperatures have reduced the fire danger ratings and the risk of wildfires in southern B.C.
The current prohibition against any open fire larger than a campfire (i.e., larger than 0.5 metres wide by 0.5 metres high) remains in effect throughout the Southeast Fire Centre. A map of the affected areas and their associated prohibitions is available online: http://ow.ly/Syab50G7ftQ
The following equipment and activities remain prohibited throughout the Southeast Fire Centre:
• Category 2 and Category 3 open fires, as defined in the Wildfire Regulation
• the use of sky lanterns
• the use of fireworks, including firecrackers
• the use of sky lanterns
• the use of air curtain burners
• the use of burn barrels and burn cages
• the use of binary exploding targets
Anyone lighting a campfire in an area where campfires are allowed must maintain a fireguard by removing flammable debris from around the campfire area and must have a hand tool or at least eight litres of water available nearby to properly extinguish the campfire.
To report an abandoned campfire, wildfire or open burning violation, call 1 800 663-5555 or *5555 on a cellphone.
Natural resource officers and conservation officers conduct regular patrols throughout British Columbia, including looking out for campfire-related infractions. Anyone found in contravention of an open fire prohibition may be issued a ticket for $1,150, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000 or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.
The Southeast Fire Centre extends from the U.S. border in the south to Mica Dam in the north, and from the Okanagan Highlands and Monashee Mountains in the west, to the B.C.-Alberta border in the east.
For the

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FOLLOWING A DISASTER, YOU MAY NEED TO STAY AT HOME WITH YOUR EMERGENCY KIT OR LEAVE IMMEDIATELY WITH YOUR GRAB-AND-GO BAGS.

July 13-21

With the extreme heat over the last couple of weeks and forecasted throughout July it is important that everyone is prepared and should have their grab-and-go bag. You can direct members of your community to learn more about building a grab-and-go bag, by visiting preparedbc.ca/gran-and-go

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FIREFIGHTERS PUT OUT GRASS FIRE EAST OF GRAND FORKS

July-28-21

Last week’s grass fire between Grand Forks and Christina Lake is believed to have been caused by a person, according to investigators at the BC Wildfire Service (BCWS).
The fire broke out at around 4 p.m., Wednesday, July 28, spreading quickly across a lightly treed hillside sloping away from the south side of the highway, roughly near the intersection of Gilpin Creek Forest Service Road.

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GRAND FORKS FIRE/RESCUE RETURNS TO GRANBY RD

Aug 07-21

Grand Forks Fire/Rescue were called to a structure fire at 9385 Granby Rd on Saturday, Aug. 7, marking the seventh time in roughly a year the department has attended a burn complaint at that address.

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GRAND FORKS FIRE/RESCUE THROWS SPLASHDOWN AT PERLEY ELEMENTARY

July-02-21

The fun started at around noon, when children in COVID-safe cohorts were taken through firefighter-themed stations set up on the school’s grass field. As in the case of the splashdown at Hutton Elementary the previous Thursday, Perley kids were instantly drawn to the department’s misting station, where an overhead water cannon had boys and girls revelling in the midday heat.
Once they’d had a good soak, kids took to the firehose and fire obstacle courses with gusto.
Dep. Fire Chief Rich Piché said that while he’d organized the splashdowns partly at the suggestion of local teachers, the department got behind the events as a way of thanking Perley and Hutton for having hosted so many fire-safe assemblies throughout the year.

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NORTH FORK FIRE HALL BOUNCES BACK FROM THE BRINK AFTER SUCCESSFUL RECRUITMENT DRIVE

May 26th,2021

https://www.grandforksgazette.ca/news/north-fork-fire-hall-bounces-back-from-the-brink-after-successful-recruitment-drive/